What the Navy told the US Patent Office…

Imagine that some unknown scientist working for the Navy tries to get a patent on an anti-gravity vehicle that’s shaped like a triangular UFO. The same guy also submits a patent for a cold fusion power source that’s shaped like the Tic-Tac of UFO/UAP fame. When he runs into resistance from the US patent office, the Navy steps in and backs him forcefully in writing, making wild claims. Try to imagine that three of this scientist’s four world-shaking patents were granted.

All this really happened.

The patent requests were submitted a short time after other scientists detected gravitational waves for the first time in 2015 – 2016, and around the time that TTSA came out with the Tic-Tac UFO/UAP videos of 2017.

The “unknown” scientist was Dr. Salvatore Pais, a US Navy aerospace engineer who was working at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division in Maryland.

One of his publicly patented inventions is called: “Craft Using an Inertial Mass Reduction Device.” The patent was granted despite a lack of peer-reviewed literature to support it. The mainstream scientific community calls it balderdash, as they do when anything groundbreaking upsets a field of “known” science.

Yet the patent of Dr. Pais’ triangular UFO design was accepted because his Navy superiors informed the patent office that his triangular craft (capable of traveling at extremely high velocities in space as well as through the atmosphere and even under water) “would soon become a reality.”

This is according to Ross Coulthart, in his book In Plain Sight. It’s a fabulously enjoyable and important book to read.

So far, despite a trail of linked documentation in the book’s footnotes, I’ve been personally unable to uncover the letter of the Navy Boss to the Patent Office. (I suspect it’s been suppressed by the Navy or cancelled by some woke racist in the US Patent Office .) But Ross Coulthart is, in my opinion, the most trustworthy reporter on Earth today. And he’s probably the most intelligent one by quite a spread, judging by how he comes across on interviews.

According to Mr. Coulthart…

Dr James Sheehy, the chief technology officer of the US Naval Aviation Enterprise, wrote: ‘This [triangular antigravity craft] will become a reality. China is already investing significantly in this area and I would prefer we hold the patent as opposed to paying forever more to use this revolutionary technology.’ – from Coulthart, Ross. In Plain Sight (p. 172). Kindle Edition.

If you’re familiar with the UFO literature, you’re reminded of the triangle over Phoenix Arizona and the “Belgium Flap” of 1989.

Black triangles have been floating and zooming silently through our skies for some time. It’s virtually impossible to deny their existence now that the Navy has confirmed the authenticity of a UFO triangle captured on night-vision video over the ocean.

Dr. Pais’ patenting adventure didn’t begin or end with the affectionately dubbed “TR3B” triangular antigravity “UFO” craft. He also brought three other major pieces of sci-fi technology to the patent office, possibly revealing for the fist time a decades-old secret compartment of US technology.

Pais’ patent requests included a “‘High’ Temperature Superconductor” a Forcefield Generator and a “High Frequency Gravitational Wave Generator” shaped something like a Tic Tac, at least in the cross-sectional diagram he submitted…

Significantly, the only one of his patents that was rejected was an energy device that, if functional and public, would put the petroleum industry out of business. The device is called a Plasma Compression Fusion Device.

For years our pal Steven Greer, MD has talked about his effort to bring a clean energy device into the world, but, as he tells it, the “sociopathic” folks behind the fossil fuel industry have covert control over the US Government to such an extent that each time a workable clean, “free” energy device surfaces, they step in, classify it, and burry it, sometimes using violence.

Over time, Dr. Greer has enjoyed several begrudged confirmations of his “wild claims.” The focused rejection of Dr. Pais’ clean energy device, seen in the context of the acceptance of all his other wild-sounding patent submissions, is another point of evidence backing Greer’s claim that Western covert powers include Big Oil and oppose clean, renewable, ultra-low-cost energy.

Why would the US Patent Office grant a patent on an antigravity UFO/UAP, but not on a similarly wild sounding clean energy device?

As with the Davis-Wilson documents, Dr. Greer is sounding more and more like he’s basically an honest man with some of the human judgement flaws common among leaders. In addition, he seems to have some of the gifts that sometimes come across as “flaws” common among experiencers of the Phenomena.

Personally, I suspect that Dr. Greer is like a few of my mentors from pathology residency days. These brilliant guys were so accustomed to being right on decades’ worth of academic multiple-guess exams, getting straight A’s throughout all their schooling, and later being considered “always right” by their mentors and peers in pathology, that they’d learned to neglect the scientist’s constant desperate need to differentiate what they KNOW from what they strongly SUSPECT.

Most real scientists, for instance, strongly SUSPECT that Macro-evolution of species via random mutation is an accurate theory, while most scientists in general “know” it’s true. As a scientist, I strongly suspect it’s NOT true, but I’m in a small growing minority there.

Dr. Greer would have a broader influence on the UFO community and beyond if he meditated carefully on what he KNOWS for sure versus what he “knows” with 99% certainty. There’s a world of difference, and emotional confidence is irrelevant in this differentiation.

And once he has made this two-column list for himself, I wish Dr. Greer would share it with the rest of the world. I think we’d all be far ahead. The UFO community would be less emotionally divided and more capable of working together toward a common goal.

There’s a book called “Risk Intelligence, by Evans.” Well worth reading. On the one hand, humans on average will NOT follow you unless you sound 100% confident in your message. I will always have few readers. But on the other hand, those who are able to accurately rank the certainty of their knowledge (each point of evidence) are able to make far better predictions, and I would suggest far more accurate connections between the rabbit holes of Ufology and the phenomena.

I don’t think Dr. Greer is alone in needing to solidify the distinction between his knows and almost-knowns. The entire UFO community, myself included, would become more accurate, less gullible, and possibly more influential if we each made this distinction a routine matter of our integrity.

For example, we know now that the Navy wants us to believe that they will soon have triangular antigravity craft in the air. I think we can be 100% certain that their agenda now includes a hope that the outside world will believe this. It leads me personally to suspect that most, but not all, of the triangular UFOs we’ve seen in recent decades were covert US technology.

But I have to differentiate the issue deliberately to avoid an unjustified emotional sense of 100% certainty…

No matter how absolutely certain I now FEEL that the US has been flying black anti-gravity triangles for decades, it’s not something that belongs in my column of “knowns.” I’m not 100% certain about it when I consult the two sleepy objective neurons in my prefrontal cortex.

“Hey guys, wake up! The Navy’s got patents on black triangles now. It all fits!”

“Wait a minute, kid. What if the Navy’s top brass are all ET’s, and the Universe is a holo-matter simulation designed to teach us how to love?”

Differentiated Love,

Morrill Talmage Moorehead, MD


If Only We Knew what Luis Elizondo knows…

The public-sanitized version of a rushed government UFO report is about to come to us from congress. Its press coverage won’t be anything like this:

Reporter: “Excuse me, Mr. Rubio, does the US have secret alien technology that China or Russia could steal and use to destroy the US?”

Mr. Rubio: “Yes, and thanks for asking. This technology makes the H-bomb look like a toy. We’ve been retro-engineering it for over 50 years in a secret underground operation that’s now a division of Skunkworks and legally exempt from the freedom of information act.” Mr. Rubio looks into the camera. “Any nations wishing to infiltrate this organization are advised to bribe or threaten the CEO of Lockheed Martin.”

Assuming for the moment that these widely held beliefs are true, most of us would agree that officially blabbing it all to the press might be unwise.

Full UFO disclosure, whatever the whole truth might be, probably resembles most everything else of importance: a choice between the lessor of two evils or between the greater of two mutually exclusive goods. Few major changes are either all good or all bad.

The world’s expanding moral grayness may rightly include the practice of not telling the whole truth about certain types of things at certain times…

“Do these glasses make my nose look big?”

“Don’t sweat it kid, your nose is an aircraft carrier.”

Sometimes the whole unvarnished truth isn’t entirely helpful, one might suggest.

As you may know, Luis Elizondo is extremely careful not to say anything that would violate his non-disclosure agreement with the US Government. I’ve heard him interviewed many times and he usually tries to avoid even giving his own opinions on things. He regularly shakes his head and tells the interviewer, “I don’t know.” A possible exception to this would be his interview with Richard Dolan that was exclusively viewed by members of his website only. A transcript of it with insightful audio commentary is linked here, if you’d like some interesting UFO reading.

Sometimes Lue Elizondo looks as though it pains him to hold back what he knows. But if he blabbed it, he would go to Jail or exile, and the mainstream media would, to the best of their ability, discredit everything he’s ever done.

Recently Lue was interviewed by Curt Jaimungal, a young man with no background in UFOs. Leu was sleep-deprived from the start, I think, and said he was low on caffeine, so by the end he was dragging, and it seems that Lue let the cat out of the bag like never before.

Near the end of the 81 minute interview, Curt repeats a question that Lue had earlier declined. Mr. Elizondo is visibly exhausted…

Curt Jaimungal (@: 1:11:15 on the video): If the general public knew or saw what you saw, what would the next week look like? How would the public react?

Luis Elizondo: Somber… uh, I think there would be this big exhale for about a day. And then this turning inward and then trying to reflect on what this means to us and our species and ourselves. I think, uh, also….

Curt Jaimungal: Somber, like a sigh of relief?

Luis Elizondo: Somber, meaning serious. Not like Hollywood portrays, people partying in the streets and silliness. I think you would have some people turning perhaps to religion more-so. You might have some people turning away from religion. I think you’re going to have… uh… at that point the philosophical and theological questions will be raised and people will have some serious soul searching to do. No pun intended. And I don’t think that’s bad, by the way. I think a lot of folks who have spent their time in this community being charlatans will be exposed and they will be probably unemployed. They’ll probably have to change their names because, you know, the rest of society will look at them in an unfavorable light. I think there are some unsung heroes that will probably come to light and the world will appreciate their contributions to this topic. I think the scientific and academic community will…

Curt Jaimungal: Names?

Luis Elizondo: No, I can’t give you those names.

Curt Jaimungal: I know. I was going to say, names that have been announced before. The unsung heroes are new names?

Luis Elizondo: Yeah, names that haven’t been announced before. New names. Uh, I think the scientific and academic community is going to have to take a real hard look at itself and see why it repeated the same mistakes that it did when Galileo proposed that the Earth was not the center of the solar system. You know, hubris is a big part of that. And then I think, you know, maybe we start the international conversation. Say… OK, we realize that there are things out there that are probably way beyond our petty discrepancies that we have with each other. Maybe we need to really start working together on this. Realize that we really are a global family. It doesn’t matter where you’re from, or it doesn’t matter what your religion is, your culture or your color or anything else. We are all brothers and sisters on this tiny little rock we call Earth, this pale blue dot that’s hurdling through space. Uh…

Curt Jaimungal: It may unify us.

Luis Elizondo: Well, I would certainly hope so. Unless we allow our poor nature to interfere, and we look at this as opportunities to subjugate each other. I would hope that’s not the case.

Wow.

Let’s think about this. If the truth that Mr. Elizondo can’t tell us is that the US government or any other known Earthly government has made scientific breakthroughs that account for the well documented physics-defying characteristics of UFOs, would anyone look inward at their own religious beliefs? Would nations and individuals realize we’re all brothers and sisters?

Not so much.

So this man seems to know that UFOs represent “off-world vehicles not made on this earth,” as Dr. Eric Davis put it to the NY Times last year. And if Dr. Davis was talking about human technology constructed on a secret orbiting space station or on a secret Moon base, would learning about this cause anyone to stop feeling racial or religious animosity toward others?

No chance.

So Luis Elizondo is (inadvertently?) implying he knows that Aliens exist and are responsible for at least some of the UFOs that the government tells us are real and of unknown origin. If you see him as the honest, sincere and objective man he portrays, then his words are probably a lot closer to full disclosure than the official congressional report we’re told to expect later this month.

But like everything else, this argument has at least two sides to consider…

I have great respect for Stephen Greer, MD who at one point said that Luis Elizondo is “a professional disinformation agent putting out false intelligence on the UFO matter in [sic] through the mainstream media.”

To give you a glimpse of Dr. Greer, here’s a recent video interview that shows his speaking style and overall thoughts on UFOs. Historically, he has been an undeniable powerhouse in the UFO community. Even his zealous detractors give him that credit, unless they’re intellectually blind. He was able to collect hundreds of personal UFO-sighting testimonies from ranking military and government officials in an era when UFOs were considered total foolishness by almost everyone in the US. He convinced some of these witnesses to go on the record in a public “disclosure” press event in DC, each witness ending with a statement of willingness to testify to congress under oath. This kind of eye-witness testimony is the sort of evidence that decides murder trials, so it carried a great deal of weight with the relatively few of us who were scientifically objective enough to care about UFOs back in the dark ages.

Despite an authoritarian public speaking style that irks some people, Dr. Greer seems to me to be a sincere and courageous man doing his level best for UFO disclosure. And nobody’s perfect. MD’s in general are sort of programmed in med school and residency to speak in authoritarian tones that sound confident when they’re really not, which is most of the time in med school and residency. I sometimes wish I had absorbed some of that bluster, but no.

Anyway, knowing just what he’s been through in school, I find myself able to ignore it when Dr. Greer sounds pedantic and supercilious. Everyone needs to work on a balance in this arena of communication, I think, but unfortunately it’s not always just a matter of style. Beyond a shadow of doubt I’ve learned (in pathology practice) that sounding chronically overconfident leads to actually becoming overconfident for many diagnosticians. And overconfidence ruins a person’s objectivity and thereby her/his accuracy in determining the truth. I’ve seen this hundreds of times with everything from dangerously weak to world-class brilliant pathologists.

So in my humble and yet infallible opinion, the most vital skill for any truth seeker is objectivity, whether you’re struggling to come up with a rare tumor diagnosis or trying to evaluate an expert’s motivation.

Doctor Greer, God love him, seems to have made one unfortunate public mistake (that I’m aware of). It seems to have damaged his credibility far more than it should have…

One day in Florida during a CE-5 (alien-calling) group, each participant having paid thousands, he mistook a fairly obvious pair of flairs for two UFOs. The event is documented in this video. As far as I know, he still believes the two falling lights were UFOs.

Naturally, Dr. Greer’s detractors have latched on to this video and accuse him of hoaxing.

For what little it’s worth, Dr. Greer seems to me to be a person who would rather die than perpetrate a hoax. Of course, I’m not Richard Dolan, a seasoned ufologist and historian whose opinion should actually carry some weight in this arena. Richard, as I understand it, respectfully disagrees with Dr. Greer on some issues, but appreciates Greer’s important body of work and doesn’t consider him capable of anything approaching a hoax.

So let’s not be too black-and-white in sizing up Ufologists if we can help it, but honestly, here’s my strong opinion on Dr. Greer’s recent name-calling episode: If Luis Elizondo is a “professional disinformation agent,” I’m a helicopter.

I could be wrong. I often am. But it would make no sense to me the way the Pentagon has lied to the public in trying to discredit Lue. Also…

Listen again to Lue’s statement of his hope for humanity after real disclosure:

“Say… OK, we realize that there are things out there that are probably way beyond our petty discrepancies that we have with each other. Maybe we need to really start working together on this. Realize that we really are a global family. It doesn’t matter where you’re from, or it doesn’t matter what your religion is, your culture or your color or anything else. We are all brothers and sisters on this tiny little rock we call Earth, this pale blue dot that’s hurdling through space.”

Leu’s message here is as distant from the elite’s orchestrated hate machine as the east is from the west. I doubt that the unelected elites running the US government are a homogeneous group in full agreement on how to leverage the UFO reality, but I can pretty much guarantee you their big dream for us depends upon increasing, not reducing, the hatred and violence they’ve patiently fertilized and grown to anti-thinking fruition in the US educational system over the last fifty years.

I’m with Lue on this. Dr. Greer, incidentally, would probably be with him, too, if he heard this interview. Every thinking person I know agrees that we humans desperately need to rise above hatred and war if we hope to survive as a species.

If only we could all learn for ourselves what Luis Elizondo already knows.

Earthling love,

Morrill Talmage Moorehead, MD


Alien Reproduction Vehicle

In real life, we tend to think in binary, black-and-white terms. The good guys versus the bad. It’s simple and ingrained.

But, as you know, if you spend a few years trying to become a fiction writer, you learn that villains can’t be all bad, and good guys can’t be flawless. Otherwise your characters are flat, unrealistic and boring.

In the UFO community, binary thinking dominates. The “evil” people of the “Cabal” (the super-dark aspects of the military-industrial complex) are supposedly all sociopaths whose only motivation is to continue hiding free energy technology and advanced propulsion technology from the public so they can line their pockets in petrodollars while petting a black cat.

The feeling is, if only we could get rid of these misanthropes, we’d have free energy, clean air, no more world hunger, and vacations to Andromada.

Maybe so, but…

Actual life is not like TV politics. The good guys are not limited to your political party, backed by the truth on the news stations you watch. The bad guys are not all members of the opposite political party, backed by the fake news on the outlets you dislike.

Real life probably isn’t even reflected in any fundamentalist religious or anti-religious group’s version of truth that puts God (or no God) on their side, while the falsehoods of other religious or anti-religious groups put Satan (or no Satan) in charge of them.

Here’s a video that describes in great detail one sincere, honest-sounding man’s insights into a 1960s flying saucer, allegedly built by Skunk Works.

Personally, I’m about 95% convinced that humanity actually has this type of technology now. Your mileage may vary. 🙂

But the thing I’m not convinced of is that the entire UFO community has an accurate assessment of the bad motivation of the insiders, the “evil sociopaths” who seem to hide and control this technology.

Let’s think about it…

Imagine you’re a fiction writer trying to get into the head of your “villain” to make her/him more of a realistic, rounded character. You need to find a legitimate reason for this person to hide zero point energy and electrogravitics from the rest of the world.

Here are some possibilities that jump out at us:

1. The technology behind zero point energy, like the technology behind nuclear power, can be used in weapons of mass destruction in addition to warming water for clean electricity production.

2. There may be some negative health or environmental side effect to the use of zero point energy. So far, nearly every technological advance we’ve made has brought an unintended negative consequence or three. A few examples: antibiotics save lives but create superbugs, all pharmaceuticals bring symptomatic (rarely causal) relief but cause lists of possible negative side effects (rarely fatal), the internal combustion engine made transportation easier but brought pollution and the megacity’s impersonal culture with ironic human isolation, diminished eye contact and a near absence of smiling… the list of examples is endless.

3. The unelected “Cabal” within the free world’s governments considers zero point energy and electrogravitic technologies to be their highest military advantages over their perceived enemies in the communist dictatorships. They are therefore loath to surrender these military advantages.

4. The use of small zero point energy devices in the houses and cars of billions around the globe might affect climate change or something much worse. All publically available energy devices generate heat as a byproduct. Perhaps a zero point energy device that could run a person’s home would not only make the grid obsolete (a wonderful thing) but also elevate the average temperature of the earth to a detrimental degree, or worse yet, warm the interface of the Earth’s crust with its core allowing the crust to detach and tilt due to the centrifugal force acting upon the heavy polar ice caps (an idea detailed in a scientific context at SuspiciousObservers.org).

5. Unlimited free energy would mean that food could be grown hydroponically in virtually inexhaustible quantities, the limitation being only in the technology of liquid fertilizers, grow lights, and the vertical stacking of crops. Ocean water could be desalinated at little cost and freely pumped to the distant corners of every desert. While this would eliminate world hunger, (yeah!) it might also eliminate humanity’s primary motivation for working. It’s difficult to speculate with confidence about this, but work seems to be essential to most people’s mental health (including children), just as exercise is essential to everyone’s physical health (including children). If free energy were to vastly diminish our need to work, it might become an extinction-level evolutionary stressor for us, or worse yet, a negative force upon the average person’s integrity. “Idle hands are the devil’s playground.”

6. The term “alien reproduction vehicle” implies the existence of literal aliens, of course. While the average person nowadays knows very little about the existence of UFOs, let alone the technology behind them, we know even less about the motivations of any alleged alien species. Stepping around the knee-jerk binary thinking of the respectable Dr. Steven Greer versus the rest of the UFO community (including my favorite UFOlogist Richard Dolan), it seems unlikely that all alien species with the capability of contacting humans would have purely benevolent or purely malevolent feelings about us. (Sentient reality, like biology, is rarely binary.) This would leave the door open to an infinite variety of motivations that the human “Cabal” might have for keeping zero point technology and electrogravitic transportation secret. For instance, perhaps an alien species has told them that secrecy is essential because widespread knowledge of these technologies leads primitive warlike species (like us) to certain self-destruction. Or perhaps aliens have threatened the “Cabal” with something terrible if they blab what they know to the public.

If you’re thinking of other possibilities, I’d like to hear them.

Anyway, the point is, the UFO community might want to look carefully and humbly at their assumptions about the binary evil of “Cabal” secrecy before stampeding downhill on their current path of public disclosure at any costs.

Non-binary love and hugs,

Morrill Talmage Moorehead, MD