UFO Worldview Control, a Vast No-wing Conspiracy

Here’s my favorite UFO historian, Richard Dolan, recounting one of the most well-documented UFO military encounters of all time, the 1976 Tehran UFO incident.

Toward the end of the video, things get interesting as Dolan shows us what the debunkers at Wikipedia have to say about this event.

True to form, Wikipedia struggles to maintain their version of a “scientific” materialist worldview, to the effect that nothing can possibly exist beyond the mundane. Anything that brings us wonder must be reduced to the ordinary, meaningless collisions of particles and energy waves acting in a randomly cruel Universe where nothing could conceivably exist beyond matter and energy. (Yawn.)

Their heads are stuck in the sand, perhaps it’s willful blindness.

Thus they would have us believe that fighter pilots are so invariably dumb they can all mistake Jupiter for a mid-air confrontation. We’re to believe that nothing actually disabled their missle-lunching systems, it was a chance failure common to those jets. The radar records are meaningless, of course, and the existence of multiple witnesses means absolutely nothing to Wikipedia’s keen eye for truth.

Furthermore, the US government’s official records showing that a description of this event reached George Walker Bush, Henry Kissinger and President Gerald Ford carry no weight whatsoever with our self-appointed gatekeepers of worldview truth, the good folk at Wikipedia. Apparently, the entire DOD was so gullible and inept in 1976 that they made a detailed report about absolutely nothing more than a sighting of Jupiter.

It reminds me of the sanitized propaganda that Congress passed to the public after their “extensive” search for UFO truth which myopically excluded events before 2004.

You might think that in view of the US Navy and the DOD telling us that UFOs are real, our Wikipedian truth fairies might revisit their pathetic hack job of debunking the 1976 event in Iran.

But no.

Their transparent thoughts and motivations are all still there, unaltered and waiting for anyone with an open mind to use Wikipedia’s own words as a clue to the larger picture of public worldview control within the US.

And Wikipedia wonders why 98 percent of their viewers don’t send them money to help prop up their mainstream worldview deceptions.

But if they truly need money, why would they continue to debunk everything unusual? Especially the mainstream-conceded UFO reality.

I think it’s because UFO reality truly escaped. It was not universally released by the insiders. So Wikipedia is trying hard along with the rest of the mainstream to maintain a grip on the public’s worldview.

A person’s worldview is the most powerful data filter in existence and it’s readily available for manipulation if you have the means. The world’s materialist overlords do happen to have the means.

I’m theorizing a vast no-wing conspiracy here.

If you control the public’s worldview, you can achieve just about any covert goal.

Here’s a rare glimpse of the elite’s worldview-control system in operation…

William J. Casey (1913-1987) was the Director of the CIA when he made the following statement at his first CIA staff meeting in 1981.

“We’ll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false.” — William J. Casey, CIA director, 1981

This quote is uncontested by debunkers, as best I can determine.

I suggest we keep this powerful man’s words in the forefront of our minds as we filter the slow drip of new UFO data through our various tightly-held worldviews, striving to be more open to evidence than claims, especially the claims of Wikipedian-style truth police and other self-appointed truth fairies.

Jupiter Love,

Morrill Talmage Moorehead, MD


Genocidal Racism? The case of the missing Vitamin D Research

I just found this important video:

This man, Dr. John Campbell, is a clinical nurse who is apparently using the title “Doctor” appropriately for modern times. I mention this because I mistakenly assumed he was an M.D. in a previous post. Sorry, this just shows my age.

Anyway, in the first part of this video, which is an excellent deep-dive into the groundbreaking paper I spoke of in the last post, Dr. Campbell suggests that there’s something sinister going on at the highest levels of healthcare…

It’s something that could be interpreted as racism with genocidal intent on the part of the international healthcare authorities.

In essence, Dr. Campbell senses conspiracy in the quite apparent reluctance of mainstream medicine to run definitive vitamin D trials on COVID-19 patients, despite the evidence in its favor. Dr. Campbell doesn’t mention racism directly, but points out the disproportionate numbers of deaths in the Black and Hispanic communities. Then he focuses on the inexpensive nature of vitamin D, leaving the listener to connect the dots to Big Pharma and the money they stand to make with a patentable drug cure, vaccine, etc.

This left me thinking about corporate elites, racism, and a conspiracy to commit genocide.

Is it just me? Probably.

Dr. Campbell has been talking on YouTube for many months about the logic and the literature evidence favoring the use of vitamin D for COVID-19 patients, especially those patients with darker skin who are at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency, and at much greater risk of dieing of COVID-19 (not by coincidence, it turns out). In light of the first small clinical trial of Vitamin D, there appears to be a cause-and-effect link here.

Ordinarily, I don’t put the brakes on a perfectly healthy conspiracy theory. To me, genuine conspiracies are common. Unless I’m mistaken, the CIA’s official job is to conspire against all perceived and potential enemies of the US. They didn’t invented the term “conspiracy theory” but there’s an internal CIA memo that uses the pleural form “conspiracy theories” in explaining how to prop up the mainstream version of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. As far as I know, their official job isn’t to influence public opinion, though they seem to believe it is. We’re told that conspiracy theories were considered a normal part of analytical thinking until the late 1950s, when delving deeper than a sports reporter became stigmatised.

But in the case of the missing Vitamin D research, I think we might NOT be dealing with an elite’s racism or genocidal intent. I think there’s a simpler explanation.

One of the first things they drilled into our heads in med school was “supplemental vitamins are hogwash.” There was one exception: pregnant woman needed extra folate to prevent neural tube defects in their babies. It probably pained the professors to admit this, but it was the exception that proved the rule for them.

“Taking vitamins just gives you expensive urine,” they said. The frightened, exhausted students laughed politely, but all such jokes have a powerful indoctrination value.

Remember the shame of letting anyone know you thought UFOs were real five to 15 years ago? That feeling came from jokes at the expense of the “crazy people.” You didn’t want to be one of them.

In the medical community, the vast majority of doctors don’t have time, curiosity or energy enough to read. Big Pharma comes by the office (with food and gifts in the old days) and presents their own funded, peer-reviewed literature about their own drugs. This is the real “continuing medical education” for many doctors in the US.

This is how many, if not most, MD’s have maintained an ignorant certainty about the uselessness of vitamin supplementation. To solidify that certainty, most of us have lectured family and friends on the subject many times, glad to be seen as an authority capable of debunking the entire over-the-counter pill industry.

In the old days at LLUMC, there was one doctor on campus who bravely bucked the anti-vitamin dogma and lectured med students on the benefits of vitamin supplementation. What an unsung hero!

He was the common brunt of jokes among the faculty, residents, and medical students.

Years later, when I was an attending pathologist, I said something positive about vitamin C. A young pathology resident across the scope looked at me incredulously. “You don’t believe in vitamins, do you? You don’t agree with Dr. ____?”

I asked him if he had read a single article of basic research showing the effects of vitamin supplementation on laboratory animals. He admitted he hadn’t. I told him he should read before making up his mind.

“But you don’t think Dr. ____ is right, do you?” he asked.

“He’s more right than the rest of us,” I said.

The resident shook his head in disbelief. What a disappointment I’d become.

And so it goes. The carefully ingrained prejudice against vitamin supplementation, drilled in by Big Pharma for decades, still exists around the world.

This is the true cause of the reluctance of those in authority to run large, so-called “definitive” clinical trials of Vitamin D on COVID-19 patients. Or am I wrong?

The “deep state/cabal/military-congressional-industrial complex” will probably never admit that they’ve been lying to us about UFOs since the 1940s.

Similarly, mainstream medicine couldn’t possibly relish the thought of demonstrating to the world just how fatally wrong they’ve been in their crusade against vitamin supplements.

Why not send a link of Dr. Campbell’s video to anyone you know who might not be taking vitamin D yet? You might save their life.

Love, Sunshine and Vitamin D3,

Morrill Talmage Moorehead, MD